Friday, December 31, 2010

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No New Year without fireworks.

I wish a Happy (Gregorian calender) New Year to all who stop by here.

For 2011, I plan to be rich, famous, successful, sporty, and partying with celebrities.

The little time I have left over from that, I will spend at work (I polish shoes for art students) or at home making drawings, surfing porn on the Internet, write obnoxious comments on other peoples websites, or ride the Copenhagen public transport into the suburbs to take photographs of dull and insignificant buildings in near darkness.

So,

to all of you:


be the magic you are.


*****
Panzer: Pzkpfw III, Ausf H
Scruffy winter whitewash seems to be the overall colour here. Note the practice of placing a strip of spare track on the turret roof.This was done not just to have it handy for battlefield repairs, but also for extra protection against enemy ground attack planes like the Il-2 Sturmovik
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Monday, December 27, 2010

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I guess I forgot to wish everybody reading this a merry Christmas
- but It's all because I was paralyzed by the fact that we've had White Christmas in Denmark for two consecutive years now and the last time that happened here was a hundred years ago...

*****
Panzer: Sturmgeschütz III - "Fahrschule"
With the entire gun mount removed, this Stug served at a Panzer training facility, note the word Fahrschule (driver's school) painted on the front.
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Monday, December 20, 2010

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My upstairs neighbour has a computer with a car racing game on it.

He really likes to play this thing (especially after he comes home late at night...) and with the sound amplified over his stereo speakers.

This means that I'm essentially exposed to what you would call "severe traffic noise"

only, it's virtual traffic noise...


Weird.

*****
Panzer: Panzerjäger Tiger Ausf. B "Jagdtiger"
Quite a small sensation, this colourslide of a Jagdtiger belonging to Schweres Panzer Jäger Abteilung 653 was published recently on an internet forum.
A unique opportunity to study the hard edge three colour camouflage scheme applied to late-war panzers.
The story goes that the poster's granddad had left him a box of colour slides from his service in WWII (read it here), the Jagdtiger in the photo "331" was transported to the US and today resides at the US Army ordnance museum, Maryland.
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Monday, December 13, 2010

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Winter and x-mas depression nibbling away at your soul?...then why not chaseth it away with some dubstep by SCUBA

Listen to SCUBA on Youtube

*****
Panzer: Sdkfz 251/1, Ausf A
Obviously photographed immediately after a combat engagement.
Most of the men seems to wear the silver Panzerkampfabzeichen, which was sometimes awarded to the Panzergrenadiere infantry units supporting the panzers during attacks.
A special version of the badge (in bronze) was created for panzergrenadiers in June 1940, which suggests the photo could have been taken before that date. During the invasion of the Low countries is my guess.
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Monday, December 06, 2010

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Funny photos from down the ages (1920s-60s) at: The Invisible Edge

*****
Panzer: Pzkpfw IV, Ausf D
The "G" marking on the front armour would place this Panzer IV with Panzergruppe 2, (commanded by Heinz Guderian) on the move during the opening phases of the attack on Soviet Russia, summer 1941.
Of note are the infantry men by the roadside equipped with much less advanced machinery...
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Monday, November 29, 2010

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A 1905 photo of Dreamland, Coney Island at night, click to see the full size

Vintage (1800s to 1970s) photos, both amateur and professional, at Shorpy.com
Presented are many high-quality photos from the dawn of photography when big negatives ruled.

*****
Panzer: Pzkpfw II, Ausf C
Some new recruits, probably at a training facility in Germany ca. 1940-42.
Note that the trooper sitting on the Panzer II (likely to be the drill instructor) is wearing the black panzer sidecap, introduced in 1940, while the recruits have to make do with the old style panzer beret as well as wearing denim fatigue work wear.
Maybe this was "now try and dig up a panzer stuck in the mud" day...
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Monday, November 22, 2010

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Yes, another "panzers only" week here at DAMIJWH!

hmmm... I'm almost beginning to like it...

*****
Panzer: Panzerjäger 38(t) für 7.62 cm PaK 36(r) Marder
Quite a long name for what was basically the fitting of some of the thousands of captured Russian 7.62 mm anti-tank guns in German inventory onto the equally captured (from the Czech) Pzkpfw 38 (t) chassis.
Judging from the dark grey surfaces on the Marders, the photo was taken in spring/summer 1942 when the first Marder III' s reached units on the eastern front. With the Marder series, the German forces finally had a mobile platform capable of stopping the Soviet T-34's facing them in the East, which might account for the happy smile on this private's face.
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Monday, November 15, 2010



Highly interesting blog for the comics "archaeologist": Topfferiana, it deals with early representations of sequential storytelling, many dating back to the mid- to late nineteenth century (site is in French)


*****
Panzer: Befehlspanzer 1
Most likely seen during training/ maneuvers before WWII. Note the housing for the "fold-down" radio aerial on the left side of the Befehlspnzer. A group of Pzkpfw II's moving up in the background.
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Monday, November 08, 2010

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Tomorrow will be Art time here in Copenhagen when legendary The Residents play at VEGA

I remember trying hard to listen to their album Third Reich'n Roll back in the eighties. Too avantgarde for my ears then, but many years later I cought their amazing CD-ROM project FREAK SHOW, with 3D animations by Jim Ludtke (who passed away in 2004)

Remember to search YouTube for their many outrageous music videos, and drop by the official website at Residents.com

*****
Panzer: Sdkfz 251/1, Ausf A
Seems to have run over a mine. Note the absence of markings of any kind.
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Monday, November 01, 2010

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Interesting photo library from Dresden, Germany at www.deutschefotothek.de

You can find many interesting photos from life in Germany, like this fine series of colour slides from WWII.

*****
Panzer: Panzerbefehlswagen mit 5cm KwK L/42
A unique colour slide taken in spring 1943 in the Belgorod area, Russia.
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Monday, October 25, 2010

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What can I tell you : A classic.

*****
Panzer: Sdkfz 250
A couple of troopers relaxing in front of a 250, most likely at a training facility or driving school in Germany.
On the left we have a veteran Obergefreiter (corporal) with combat awards on his uniform, while his friend on the right looks more like a fresh recruit.
The ribbons in the buttonhole of the corporal are the Iron Cross, II class and the Ostmedailje. This combined with the dark grey colouring of the Sdkfz 250 would place the photo somewhere in 1942 since the Ostmedaille was awarded to qualifying personnel who had seen service during the invasion of Soviet-Russia from November 15, 1941 to April 15, 1942 (German soldiers sarcastically referred to it as "the frozen meat order") Also of note is the wound badge in silver (awarded for three or four wounds) and the bronze version of The Infantry assault badge, awarded only to personnel from motorized units.
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Monday, October 18, 2010

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"The Father of Fractals" Professor of Mathematics Benoît Mandelbrot has passed away.

A great scientist no doubt but in a way partially responsible for all those ghastly Techno club flyers from the nineties!

Well, fractals really blew my mind when they became popularized in the 1990's, the way I saw it, science had discovered the "algorithm of nature" the one basic concept that could create anything - mountains, clouds, planets.

Those trippy graphics did a lot too...

Apparantly Mandelbrot was also slightly eccentric, he began calling himself Benoît B. Mandelbrot but never had a middle name.

*****
Tiger I E (early production)
A badly mauled Tiger, the many missing road wheels most likely the result of anti-tank mines. Despite the sorry looking state of the Tiger, damage like this could be quickly repaired by the unit's workshop since no vital parts like the armour plates, gun mount or engine compartment seems to have received hits.
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Monday, October 11, 2010

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Where did it go...this need to communicate?..this need for expressing myself on the internet information highway?...

Gone, gone...like smegma under a well-aimed shower head.

*****
Panzer : Pzkpfw IV, Ausf F2
First to feature the long barreled 75 mm main gun, the F-series started out with the shorter gun, but as production switched to KwK 40 L/43 armament, the later vehicles were simply designated "F2".
It entered service on the battle fields of North Africa and the Soviet Union in spring/ summer 1942 and finally provided the Panzerwaffe with a much needed main battle tank capable of meeting the Soviet T-34 and KV-1 on equal terms. It also gave the Afrikakorps the upper hand against Western allied armour in the desert, but fortunately for the course of WWII they received far too few of them. The F2 was quickly superseded by the Ausf G, which was almost identical to it , except for a few minor changes. The ball shaped muzzle brake (on the F2) is the most distinguishing difference between them.

Monday, October 04, 2010

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(hmm, no, nothing to say...)

*****
Panzer: Sdkfz 251/9, Ausf C "Stummel"
A fine photo of this fire support half track in wintry surroundings.
The 251/9 mounted a short 75 mm gun (initially leftovers from Stug III and Panzer IV production when it switched to the long barreled version)
The "Stummel" (stumb) provided some extra "bite" to reconnaissance units if they encountered strong enemy forces. Note the tactical and unit markings on the front armour plate (the unit symbol is unknown to me) and the troopers wearing the reversible winter hood for extra warmth and protection, a Sdkfz 250 is also visible to the right.
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Monday, September 27, 2010

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(empty)

*****
Panzer: Sdkfz 232 6 rad (Fu)
Judging by the crew all wearing the panzer beret and the solid white cross markings on the 231, this photo was most likely taken immediately before (or after) the invasion of Poland, 1939. Note that for some reason the main armament - normally a 20 mm KwK 30, has been removed.
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Monday, September 20, 2010

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Drooleth ye over (but not ON, because you are viewing them on a computer screen) the classic modernist-expressionist woodcuts of Frans Masereel, published in Berlin, 1925 as:

The City

*****
Panzer: Sdkfz. 8
Not armoured, so technically not a "Panzer", but this fourteen ton behemoth served along with them in mechanized units, mainly towing heavy artillery pieces. It should of course not be confused with its much more commonly seen "little brother" the Sdkfz. 7 which towed the legendary "88"anti-aircraft/ anti-tank guns and formed the basis for a number of specialist half-tracks.
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Monday, September 13, 2010

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Depressed?..disillusioned?..lonely

confused, terrified

sad?..


Sounds like your life really sucks.


I, however avoid that sort of thing by going to phunn places on the web, like:

Panzerpixel.de

The creation of freelance author Thomas Anderson who collects original WWII photos of - yes you've guessed it: The Panzers!
He has quite an interesting collection with some very rare vehicles.

*****
Panzer: Sdkfz 252
Found on Panzerpixel.de, this Sdkfz 252 munitions carrier dating back to the early days of WWII was converted into a radio vehicle (note the "star" aerial) by a Sturmgeschütz unit and still served in 1944.
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Monday, September 06, 2010

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Harvey Pekar did not like airports...Illustration from: Muncie, Indiana


RIP Harvey Pekar (died July 12)

Pekar brought literature and the graphic novel closer to each other, mainly known for his American Splendor, I can highly recommend one of his collaborations with cartoonist Gary Dumm :

Ego and Hubris: The Michael Malice story

Well-crafted storytelling, with the graphics perfectly fitting the Ayn Rand fueled, cubicle-and-coffee computer worker world of the protagonist.

*****
Panzer : Tiger I, Ausf E (early production)
Damaged during transport, possibly the work of local partisans.
Note the narrow "transportation" tracks used on the Tiger, to make it fit the standard Deutsche Reichsbahn flatcars. The wide "combat" tracks were stored under the Tiger for the train ride (just visible under the bow armour plate) and had to be fitted by a workshop crew before it was ready for action.
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Monday, August 30, 2010

*****

The Martin Rev setup

Synth-punk-rock-performance-art-legends SUICIDE played Copenhagen this Friday.

Performing at the Danish National Gallery (courtesy of glorious Art Freq) I was there with my camera and have uploaded a few lucky shots.

The sound was a bit murky from where I was standing, but definitely LOUD and I'll agree that musically this was perhaps not one of the duo's peak performances, but I had the pleasant memory of seeing them play at the Roskilde Festival in 2003 in a much larger room (tent actually) which improved the aural experience a great deal.

As a nostalgia, and sort of "lifetime achievement-" event it was unsurpassed.
Suicide belong to the few who have created something unique in music, and one of the VERY few (only?) acts who have created electronic music with the same raw edge and driving rhythm you find in rock. You sometimes get the feeling that all electronic musicians wants to be the next Mozart, and never the next Chuck Berry... but not so for Messrs. Vega & Rev - they came to caress behinds with the army boot sole. On top of that, there is something very joyful about two gentlemen aged seventy plus still being creative, menacing and crazy. Martin Rev must be the scariest looking septuagenarian not in a holding facility.

As usual, Alan Vega got slagged (by the reviewers) for, well... being Alan Vega.
These days the criticism directed at him is not about his screaming into the microphone (people do that all the time to pass their art-school exams) or for swinging a motorcycle chain on stage (teenage girls do that all the time in schoolyards to mark their territories), no - he was:

"messing up his lyrics and needed help with his sheets of text..."

the horror!

You've got to hand it to Vega: Forty years ago he pissed off even the Pope of Beat: Allen Ginsberg, by playing in a band called Suicide (too offensive a name for the author of HOWL...), ten years later Suicide alienated the punk generation by using synths instead of guitars (this coming from a group of people who hated guitar solos...) and now reviewers, who were just being born when the duo's first album came out, can be provoked, soured, disappointed, because he,

FORGOT HIS LINES...

In my recollection of the punk scene, you were lucky if the announced bands turned up and were capable of entering the stage (and didn't begin demolishing it) so it's just tooooo baaaaad these condescending concert consumers couldn't have Alan Vega returned to the store where he was bought and replaced with a fresh copy.


In my view: A primo night, it's good to see trail blazing pioneers get the credit they deserve, even if you wondered if they wouldn't have been more comfortable playing in an abandoned XXX-movie theater instead of a state-sponsored art museum.

Walking home alone in the streets of Copenhagen after the show was the perfect way for me to celebrate it. The magic in your head. The ringing in your ears. Descending from the high (no, I gave up drugs years ago... I was high on LIFE man!)

Too bad it didn't snow.

(it always snowed back in the eighties, even during summer...and by "snow" I mean those tiny frozen water thingies floating in air)

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Sturmgeschütz III, Ausf F8
A companion photo to the one shown last week.
A very beat-up StuG, either waiting for repairs or maybe "cannibalized" for useful parts by the unit's workshop company and then left for later transport to one of the refurbishing plants far behind the front lines or back in Germany. If this was not possible, the panzer would be blown up to avoid any future use by the enemy.
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Monday, August 23, 2010

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Autumn seems to hit Copenhagen early this year. We've had monsoon-like showers for about a month now, and more on the way.

I like autumn, and welcome this.

But.

For those who do not, why not catched ye some cheer-up time by clicking ye way over to vintage florida beach babe postcards


*****
Sturmgeschutz III, Ausf F8
As the written message on the back of this photo says it was taken in the Russian city of Rostow (German spelling) in 1943.
Rostov (on the Southern front) changed hands between German and Soviet forces no less than three times in 1941-43.
Note the "Winterketten" tracks fitted. Wider than normal tracks, they were specially designed for the deep snow encountered on the Eastern front.
Of special interest is the colouring of the StuG. It was part of a batch produced in december 1942 and earmarked for the battles in Northern Africa and thus finished in overall desert brown. Some of these StuGs were instead dispatched for urgent service on the Eastern front, where it would normally have received a coating of whitewash for winter camouflage. Why this has not been done is hard to determine but it's most likely a case of the troopers having more important things to do, like fighting the Soviets. As can be seen by the powderdust on the gun's muzzlebrake, the StuG has been in use for some time when the photo was taken. Also note the crew wearing the early version of the German Army reversible winter uniform, colored mouse grey on the "spring-autumn side" (the other side was of course white) These were introduced in autumn 1942 after the Wehrmacht's disastrous experiences with the Russian winter in 1941-42. It looks like brand new uniforms being worn (they would be returned to Germany when winter was over for repairs and cleaning and then re-issued the next autumn)The trooper in the middle of the group is also wearing the special heavy winter boots made from felt. Later versions of the reversible winter uniform were made from various types of camouflage material on the non-white side

Monday, August 16, 2010

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American writer Charles Bukowski (1920-1994) photographed in the 1990's when he began using a Macintosh IIsi computer instead of a typer.

Unlike some of his contemporaries on the artistic circuit, Bukowski did not see the computer as "the devil's tool", a threath to the true magic of creativity. Instead, he praises his Mac in several poems, explaining how it made it much easyer for him to do the writing, and also gave him a new perception of the word.

Too bad he wasn't considered for Apple's "Think Different" campaign.

If your recollection of Charles Bukowski is that of a raving boozehound copulating with overweight prostitutes on the dirty floors of skid row hotels you are talking about the early Bukowski (of his prose writing), but I can highly recommend giving his collections of poetry a try, like this one. One of his best.

For me, his down to earth observations and simple style often touch something deep, like one of my favourite lines of his:

"Poetry is what happens when nothing else can."



Charles Bukowski would have been ninety years old today.


*****
Pzkpfw III, Ausf H
A group of Panzer III's parked for a staff meeting during the invasion of Soviet Russia, summer of 1941.
Note the "bedstead" aerial of a Befehlspanzer III in the foreground and the "30.." numbering on the middle Panzer III.
"Zero" numbers (300, 301, etc) were usually reserved for vehicles serving with the staff of panzer units . Also note the two officers sitting on the turret of the middle panzer III holding some white boards, presumably map tables. All the men have their attention directed at the same point in the distance, most likely at a battle going on. Also note the non-standard wooden stowage boxes fitted to the read ends of all three Panzers, and the swastika flags draped over them. The flags were used for air-recognition during the first stages of this campaign when the Luftwaffe had almost complete command of the skies.
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Monday, August 09, 2010

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????????????????????????????

Chasing away summertime weariness with a thrilling questionaire for you readers here at DAMIJWH!

A: Is this blog getting boring, or has it always been boring?
B: When visiting DAMIJWH, would you rather be doing something else?
C: If DAMIJWH was a horse, would you bet on it?
D: If DAMIJWH was a woman, would you have sex with it in a cheap hotel room and include that scene in a script you were writing for television? (your part grossly exaggerated and with unrealistic dialogue, mainly because it never happened in real life)

Your answers in the comments!

*****
Befehlspanzer III
A fine photo from 1942 when the German Panzerwaffe was enjoying the last successes of the Blitzkrieg-era during their drive into Southern Russia. Beyond lay Stalingrad and the long hard retreat that took up the remainder of WWII for the Panzers. The divisional symbol of the 24'th Panzer Division can be seen on the front armour of the Sdkfz 251 immediately behind the Befehlspanzer, one of three Panzer Divisions destroyed at Stalingrad. Note the "bedstead" aerial of this command version of the Pzkpfw III, visible behind the commander, and the manner of wearing the headphones so the commander (strangely, only with the rank of private) can hear both the communication over the radio and vocal information.
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Monday, August 02, 2010

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Yes, right...back...hmmm... but not much going on...
Due to illness in my family I've spend quite some time this summer in the small town where I grew up.

Interesting in many ways - did you know that out in the country, if you are late for the bus and running towards it, the bus driver will WAIT FOR YOU (!!!)

My father also claims his neighbors sometimes "helps him"...

Strange people out there, and so different from us city folk.

*****
Pzkpfw V "Panther", Ausf D
Badly shot up, this Panther belonged to the 1'st SS-Panzer division while fighting in Normandy, France 1944. Note the "I03" marking denoting a vehicle belonging to the staff of the Panzer regiment.
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Friday, July 02, 2010

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Art by Basil Wolverton


And for today: last day at the job.

See you in August.

*****
Sdkfz 251/1, Ausf A
National markings seems to be entirely missing from this 251 which could suggest the photo was taken during pre-WWII maneuvers. Still, when looking closely at the car on the right side of the photo you can just make out a swastica flag draped over the front end (hidden under the "antikfuchs1" label) this was a common practise during Operation Barbarossa, the invasion of Soviet-Russia in the summer of 1941. It was not meant as a demonstration of fervent Nazism, but done to make sure the German forces could be recognised from the air. Advances in the early stages of this campaign were so swift that Wehrmach mobile units sometimes arrived at objectives before the Luftwaffe planes sent out to perform pre-attack bombings.

Monday, June 28, 2010

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Checketh ye out! - the design so new and most cooleth for my personal webpage at www.lennardgrahn.dk

(and if you're the hip, up-to-the-moment type of person who consider the personal web page an outdated relic of the nineteen nineties, you're right!)

*****
Panzerkampfwagen V, "Panther", Ausf G
A highly interesting photo, taken some time after the end of WWII. The Panther seems to have the early to mid production exhaust pipes (without the flame dampers mounted on late production vehicles) It also lacks "Zimmerit" anti-magnetic coating, which would place it within a very small batch of Panthers manufactured in late 1944.
One of the two boys seen playing on the roof of the turret is holding some sort of disc-shaped device. This could be an infrared searchlight, fitted to a very small number of Panthers in early 1945, giving them the ability to fight at night. Several photos exist of Panthers fitted with the special stowage box housing the IR devices when they were not in use (the box a bit larger, and replacing the standard right hand stowage box mounted on the rear armour plate)
Whether these advanced devices were used operationally or not is still the subject of debate.

Monday, June 21, 2010

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My video masterpieces now viewable at beautiful and glorius www.Vimeo.com

(this site offers better quality online video than YouTube.com)

******
Panzer Pzkpfw Tiger, Ausf E
Found abandoned in the streets of a Sicilian town. Note that the commanders cupola is missing.
^^^^^^

Monday, June 14, 2010

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Dig that classic Interview Magazine cover art made by Richard Bernstein (1939-2002)

Many more (small size...) in the Interview Magazine archives, go to the late 1970s and 1980s sections for the best stuff

******
Panzer Pzkpfw III, Ausf M
Judging from the landscape, this photo could have been taken just before or during the Battle of Kursk, 1943.On the nearest Panzer III you can clearly see the loose manner of spraying camouflage colours onto vehicles. This was done by the units themselves, which were supplied with standardized paints, enabling them to create camouflage fitting the terrains they operated in.
^^^^^^

Monday, June 07, 2010

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A "Ruinophiliac" - you?.. then please take note that you haven't seen ruins until you've visited Japan's Battleship Island

*****
Panzer Pzkpfw V "Panther" Ausf A
Judging from the dot-pattern camouflage uniforms worn by the crews, this Panther served with a Waffen-SS unit in the summer of 1944.
^^^^^

Monday, May 31, 2010

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Photo by Mary Ellen Mark

R.I.P Dennis Hopper, 1936-2010

*****
Panzer Pzkpfw IV, Ausf H
A photo taken in my native land Denmark, where Panzer-Abteilung 55/233 Panzer-Division was stationed in 1944. A row of Panzers rolling down cobblestone roads early in the morning must have made the locals happy...
Photo courtesy of www.panzerphotos.dk by Christian Ankerstjerne
^^^^^^

Monday, May 24, 2010

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Hmm, yes, winter has left us and now we have spring.
and after that we get summer.

hmm, yes...hmm.

******
Panzer Sdkfz 250/10 "Neuer art"
In late 1943 the design of the Sdkfz 250 was changed to simplify production and the number of armour plates making up the hull was reduced from nineteen to just nine.This new line of vehicles were known as the "neuer art" or just "neu". The Pak 37 mounted on the roof was hardly a potent anti tank weapon by 1943, but it could still deliver some extra bite against armored cars and light skinned vehicles and this version of the 250 was often used by unit commanders.Note the tactical sign of a motorized (but not half-tracked) unit painted on the front armourplate.
^^^^^^

Monday, May 17, 2010

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Oh,yes, spring!..almost forgot about that...well, it was kind of "2009" and boring anyway...

******
Panzer Sdkfz 250/9
Usually deployed by an Aufklarungs Abteilung (forward recon units) this example had its armament removed and the trooper is either US or from the Free French Forces.
^^^^^^

Sunday, May 09, 2010

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Russian sniper Roza Shanina (1924-45)

A kindergarden teacher, she joined the Red Army in 1943 and had 54 kills to her name before she died in the battles in East Prussia, january 1945.
Her diaries and letters were published after the war, making her one of the most famous heroes of The Great Patriotic War.
Three of her four brothers were also killed in the war.

******
Panzer Sdkfz 250/3
Looks like a brand new vehicle.
^^^^^^

Monday, May 03, 2010

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American photographer Todd Hido, is - just like Moi, drawn to the lure of the suburbs at night...

******
Panzer Sdkfz 250
A highly dramatic photo, possibly posed for propaganda use. The official German Propaganda Kompanie photographers usually worked in teams and sometimes posed as "ordinary soldiers" in each others photos. The Sdkfz 250 was the "little brother" of the Sdkfz 251 personnel carrier series and was often used by front line commanders as a sort of "battlefield taxi". It could handle difficult terrain, was armoured, small in size - which meant it could hide better from ground attack aircraft, but large enough to carry the commander, radio equipment and a couple of trusted men as body guards. Judging from the rabbit fur lined winter parkas and camouflage caps worn by the soldiers, they served with a Waffen-SS unit since these garments were issued only to SS personnel.
^^^^^^

Monday, April 26, 2010

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Anyone who has seen Stanley Kubrick's "2001: A space Odyssey" will remember the torus shaped space station, elegantly spinning to the waltzes of Johan Strauss.

The concept of the spinning torus (which creates artificial gravity in space) was the brain child of Wernher von Braun, dating back to january 1946 when von Braun - now in the custody of the USA, was outlining the future uses for rocket science and space technology.

Much to the dismay of von Braun and his colleagues, the pragmatic Americans were not interested in the fantasy world of space travel. Instead they had the team work on the Redstone Rocket which was to be the first nuclear armed balistic missile developed for the US military.

Although happy to be working in the US, Von Braun's lifelong dream of putting man into space was still unfulfilled by the early 1950's, causing him a great deal of frustration.

This would change dramatically when he teamed up with America's romantic dreamer supreme - Walt Disney.

Together they collaborated on "the selling of space" where Disney Studios produced a series of short films showcasing the fantastic drama of space travel while pointing out that this was not just fantasy, but within the reaches of science. The first film was Man in Space

By populizing space travel outside the circles of science and the military, von Braun gained the support and funding he needed. On July 29, 1958 NASA was established with von Braun as director and work could begin on his masterpiece, which would eventually put man on the Moon: the Saturn V rocket.

******
Panzer Jagdpanzer IV (L70)
The Jpz IV series introduced in 1944 was intended to be the principal Wehrmacht "tank hunter" replacing stop-gap vehicles like the "Marder" series and the obsolete Sturmgeschütz III. The lack of a revolving turret created a low silhuette vehicle, ideal for hiding in ambush and also reduced production time and costs. Unfortunately the long Kwk 42 main gun made the vehicle slow and nose heavy and since it was the same gun used for the "Panther" tanks they were also in short supply. A later variant - Jpz IV (L48) was fitted with the same armament as the Panzer IV. Note the factory applied hard edge camouflage, and the amusing fact that the workers at the paint shop forgot to paint under the gun support - a triangular piece of the dark yellow underpainting is clearly visible on the armour plate below the support.
^^^^^^

Friday, April 16, 2010

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Checketh ye out! - my photos showing on the photo blog of Danish newspaper Information

******
Panzer Sdkfz 234/2 "Puma"
Also the legendary Puma armoured car ended up at the Aberdeen Proving ground, but was regrettably one of the vehicles scrapped in the 1950's. A notable feature of German eight-wheeled armoured cars was their ability to drive in both directions (the rear set of wheels could also be steered) which might explain why the turret has been turned 180 degrees on this Puma.
^^^^^^

Monday, April 12, 2010

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Discovered the life of american author Robert E. Howard

Born a Texan in 1906, Howard wrote stories from the age of nine and was on the verge of publishing his first novel when he committed suicide in 1936.

Before this tragic event, he had for many years built himself a reputation as a prolific writer for Pulp magazines and here he created the character Conan the Barbarian

(or Conan The Cimmerian as he was originally called)


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Panzer Bergepanzer 38 (t) "Bergehetzer"
A recovery version of the "Hetzer" also turned up at the US Army test facility Aberdeen Proving Ground. Unfortunately for post war panzer fans, many of the most rare vehicles were scrapped after testing, while the majority of the remaining collection was stored outdoors, subjecting it to the European climate of Maryland.
^^^^^^

Monday, April 05, 2010

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Don Dixon cover art from "The Best of Isaac Asimov" (Sphere Science Fiction, 1977)

Tripping out with Don Dixon space art

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Panzer Munitionsschlepper
A specially made munitions carrier, used for the 2 Ton shells fired by the Karl Gerät

Monday, March 29, 2010

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Amazingly Cool Looking Architecture Day here today, with:

The Johnson Wax Building by Frank Lloyd Wright

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Panzer Sdkfz 250/9
Designed as a recon vehicle for Panzer Divisions, this specimen was brought to the US and tested at the Aberdeen Proving Ground after WWII.
^^^^^^

Monday, March 22, 2010

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Rediscovering one of my old favourites, Italian artist Valerio Adami

Lot's of pics on This Blog

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Panzer Bergepanther, Ausf A
Photo from the Aberdeen Proving Ground where the US Army tested a wide range of captured German equipment after WWII.
^^^^^^

Monday, March 15, 2010

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Actor Peter Graves dies at 83, known for Mission Impossible's Agent Phelps and Airplane! 's Captain Oveur

^^^^^^
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Downtown Timbuktu

Timbuktu Chronicles
- New York based entrepreneur and venture capitalist, Emeka Okafor, blogs about the impact of paradigm breaking technologies in Africa.

Timbuktu - city of legends

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Panzer Kätchen
A prototype design for a fully tracked armoured personnel carrier based on the Pzkpfw 38(t) chassis. Intended as a replacement for the Sdkfz 251 and 250 half tracks.It was in stages of advanced development at the end of WWII, but did not see service.
^^^^^^

Monday, March 08, 2010

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Yes, spring is on its way!

It just doesn't know it yet.

And also, today is International Woman's Day

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Panzer Pzkpfw II "Luchs" prototype
Two nice photos of the prototype which later became the light scout/ recon panzer.
^^^^^^

Monday, March 01, 2010

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the eighties...I miss their simple and joyous playfullness.

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Panzer Pzkpfw I, Ausf F
An amateur photo from a vehicle dump somewhere in Europe immediately after WWII.
With only 25 produced, the Panzer I, Ausf F was not a very common sight by 1945 and this could quite possible have been the last one left.
^^^^^^

Monday, February 22, 2010

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It's late autumn, 1979.

I'm standing on Vesterport station in Copenhagen. I've drifted off into my own world and my dad is telling me to hurry up because our train has arrived and we can't miss it.

I'm thirteen years old.

I've just had an epiphany.

I've just seen the movie Apocalyse Now

at the big Palads Cinema Copenhagen, right next to Vesterport Station.

mind blowing.

At thirteen, I suppose you're just waiting for your mind to be blown by something.

For most people it's losing their virginity, or the first time getting drunk or stoned (in my generation, probably all three put together)

For me it was that movie.

I came out of the theatre thinking : I WANT TO MAKE SOMETHING LIKE THAT!

Well, it's a long time ago now and I never did become a film maker, but somehow that experience was part of my decision to become an artist, and I'm still waving that flag. Even if the wind died down and I lost the pole.

All-rightie, Lennard...another stroll down memory lane - so what's your favourite scene then?... the helicopter attack?..(giggle!)

yeah, yeah...but it's not the action...the moving camera...the use of Wagner... it's the part in the beginning of the attack where we cut from the inside of the Colonel's command helicopter to down on the ground, with the Vietnamnese about to be attacked.
It's very quiet down here (contrasting with the cacophonic noise inside the helicopter) ...you can hear the "choppers" approaching, and a female Vietcong in full uniform is ordering a female schoolteacher dressed in the traditional white long shirt of the vietnamnese to get the school children out of the little school house.

You've seen what's coming: Colonel Kilgore and his merry pranksters of death...and now you see where they're going: A humble hut with women, delicate like flowers, and sweet little school children.

You know it's going to get ugly from there, and you know damn well where to put your symphaties.

What a story teller, Coppola...what a romantic...what an Italian!

Many years later I saw the documentary "Hearts of Darkness" where Coppola predicts the video revolution of fifteen years later, with websites like YouTube : The great hope

yes,

what an artist:

Francis Ford Coppola

Maybe I should buy some of your wine and drink to you one day.

But I was never really into that type of thing.

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Panzer Pzkpfw V "Panther", Ausf D
Looks like a parade is about to take place at a tank production facility. Note the row of dark grey Panzer III's behind the dark yellow Panther, suggesting the photo was taken in early spring 1943 before the first Panthers were delivered to frontline units.

^^^^^^

Monday, February 15, 2010

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If you're as big a fan of the Underworld comic strip (by mighty KAZ) as I am, you'll enjoy these animated versions of select strips! - now available at www.mylittlefunny.com


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Panzer Sturmgeschütz III, Ausf B
Some StuG men relaxing in wintry conditions. All are wearing the field grey version of the Panzer beret, as required for self-propelled artillery crews. The Death's head symbol was used both officially and un-officially by a wide variety of German units during and before WWII - most notoriously by the 3'rd SS-Panzer Division "Totenkopf", which these soldiers do not belong to.
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Monday, February 08, 2010

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If you are from a generation that dabbled i plastic modeling, you'll surely remember all of them fancy Box art paintings - displaying the model you were about to assemble in a dramatic action scenario! and though the art of plastic-modeling is on the decline, this genre of art is still alive with artists like Ukranian Gleb Vasilyev


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Panzer Tiger I E, early
Looks like a brand new Tiger about to enter service after being unloaded and readied at the railway station (the MG 34 usually fitted in a ballmount on the left side of the front armour plate has not yet been installed) The large number "9"is not the standard type of vehicle numbering and must have been applied by railway personnel or at the factory delivering the Tiger.
^^^^^^

Tuesday, February 02, 2010

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Children from Stalingrad returning to school after the battle.

The Battle of Stalingrad ended on February 2, 1943

Sixty seven years ago today.

The battle is widely acknowledged as representing the turning point of WWII and according to Wikipedia it was the bloodiest battle in the history of warfare with a total of 1,2 – 1,8 million casualties (killed, wounded, missing, and sick, counting both sides of the conflict)

The photo is from an remarkable series taken immediately after the battle by a Soviet photographer previously unknown to me: Strunnikov, the entire series can be seen here

Of special note is this one - I can't remember seeing a more grim depiction of military defeat.

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Panzer Sdkfz 250 & 251
Halftracks in a vehicle dump after the battle of Stalingrad. The 14'th, 16'th and 24'th Panzer divisions were completely destroyed in the battle.
^^^^^^

Monday, January 25, 2010

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Bored at work?.. bored at home?.. bored aboard the attack hovercraft heading for Al-Quaida strongholds on the Yemen coastline?.. WELL! why not surfeth ye over to The Quietus for some excting and intelligent writing (I'm not making this up...), on ROCK music and POP culture.

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Panzer Sdkfz 131, Panzerjäger "Marder II"
Some amateur shots from spring/ summery 1943. Mounting the PAK 40 75 mm anti tank gun on a tracked platform like the obsolete Pzkpfw II was one way of keeping the Soviet T-34's at bay. Note the unusual open centered balkenkreuz national cross, barely visible on the side of the fighting compartment (next to the shovel)
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Monday, January 18, 2010

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Graphic found on weaterncivilizationandculture.blogspot.com - the views and opinions on this website are (definetely!) not mine

Discovered this fine 2008 article from the New York Times about Sharia law, Why Shariah? - written by Noah Feldmann, a law professor from Harvard University.

The article clears up a few things about what Sharia law actually means, asserts its historical significance to lawmaking in general, and tries to give an explanation to why there is an embrace of Sharia today among some Muslim communities.

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Panzer Pzkpfw V "Panther", Ausf G
A group of early production Ausf G's parading in the summer of 1944.
^^^^^^

Wednesday, January 13, 2010

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My birthday today, fourty-four years of unstoppable action!

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What's up at YouTube: Tommy Seebach: Hip Hurra
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Panzer Befehlspanzer III, Ausf E
Taken around 1940 I believe. Note that three different types of (regulation) headgear are being worn: The black Panzer beret, the Army field grey peaked cap for NCO's and the Army field grey sidecap.
^^^^^^

Monday, January 11, 2010

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Illustration by glorious etchasketch

Illustrationart - an absolutely great blog mixing examples of illustration art, comic book art, digital art and fine art powdered with the blogger's (one David Apatoff) witty insightfulness,
- diggeth ye for instance this hilarious posting: Ink and commitment


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Panzer Pzkpfw VI "Tiger I" Ausf E
Judging from the protective cover over the gun's muzzle brake, and all crewmen except the driver riding on the outside of the Tiger, this photo was taken in a safe area behind the front lines. Note the abandoned Russian SU-85 assault gun being examined by German personnel on the right.
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Monday, January 04, 2010

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The "all-clear-bubble-top-egg-shaped-futuristic-car" has been around for quite some time, except on the roads...this one is from 1948

Paleofuture.com - a highly interesting blog that digs into "The future that never was" - meaning visualizations of the future in popular media that didn't come true.

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Panzer Pzjg 38 (t) "Hetzer"
An interesting look into a factory building Hetzers under German control in Czechoslovakia 1944-45.
^^^^^^