Monday, August 29, 2011



For those with an interest in vernacular photography, a remarkable collection of 2500+ private photos of Estonian WW II servicemen (and women) can be viewed on this Facebook profile

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Panzer: Pzkpfw II, Ausf C
A photo displaying the grim realities of war. Since a Panzer II, like the one seen in the background only held a crew of three, these five (or six?) fallen Panzermänner must have been casualties from several destroyed vehicles. Note the swastika flag (below the cross on the far right) and track links decorating the graves.
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Monday, August 22, 2011

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Photo taken a few seconds before the security people confiscated my camera...but what about all those people taking pictures with their cellphones? I asked them - can't do a thing about it!, they replied and led me to the wardrobe where I had to deposit my camera untill the show was over

Blaasted... seeing techno legend Aphex Twin play in Copenhagen. With six thousand people assembled in the new venue at TAP 1 (formerly, the Carlsberg Breweries) it became a celebration of the power of Rave-culture.

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Panzer: Pzkpfw V, "Panther", Ausf D
Parked at what looks like the barracks of a training unit or maybe some factory grounds. Note the open pistol port on the top side of the turret, just below the early style "dustbin" cupola. The port enabled the Panther's crew to fire pistols or sub machine guns against attacking infantry. A round "plug" suspended from a chain covered it when not in use. The pistol port was omitted on later versions of the Panther since it was deemed unnecessary and weakened the armour plate.
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Monday, August 15, 2011

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“King Chrome” © Win­ston Smith, 2011

Connoisseurs of Punk Paraphernalia would be familiar with the collage-art of the artist hiding under the pseudonym of Winston Smith, perhaps best know for his contributions to the cover art of The Dead Kennedy's


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Panzer: Sdkfz 251/3, Ausf B
Fitted with varying types of long-range radios this vehicle was often used as the personal "mount" for high ranking Wehrmacht officers on the level of Divisional- or corps command. Technology like this enabled them to communicate directly with sub-unit commanders, including Luftwaffe and artillery units, and move with the shifting front lines on the modern mechanized battlefield. Note the lack of national markings and the self made tarpaulin fitted to the aerial to provide some protection from strong sunlight and harsh weather. I believe a capital "G" can be made out on the rear end of the car in front of the 251, most likely placing this vehicle with Panzergruppe 2 under the command of Heinz Guderian during the early stages of the invasion of Soviet-Russia, 1941.
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Monday, August 08, 2011

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Back in younger days, I worked as a cleaning attendant at the big state hospital in Copenhagen - Rigshospitalet. During the summer holidays, when there was less activity at the hospital, we were put to work in small teams cleaning up entire wards that had been closed down temporarily for this purpose. We had plenty of time to do the work, which meant we also had plenty of time to do nothing. In one of the wards we found a huge stack of large boards made from cardboard, used by the hospital staff for organizing their work schedule. The hospital was one of the tallest buildings in Copenhagen, sixteen stories high, so we folded the boards into big paper airplanes and went out on the balcony to fly them. Unfortunately, there was draft and turbulence surrounding the building, so our paper planes could never fly more than a few feet off the building before they did a nosedive and spiraled to the ground, looking pathetic. One very hot and dull day I was alone in the ward. The others had probably gone down to the Cafeteria to buy cigarettes and ogle some nurses. Being bored, I made a paper airplane from one of the boards and let it go from the balcony. And to my surprise, it just kept going...and going - and going! Without any trouble, and in a straight line, it flew away from the hospital, across the large parking lot in front of the hospital, across the street and over the apartment blocks on the other side of the street, heading for central Copenhagen. I lost sight of it, but it was still flying. "Crazy!" I thought...it must have been the warm winds creating some up drift... or maybe it was just a freak incident. I was ecstatic, Lennard Grahn - master paper planeer! But then I thought: "nobody is going to believe me if I tell them..."

So I didn't.

(but now I've told you, dear reader - perhaps you believe me?..)



Panzer: Sdkfz 263 Panzerfunkwagen 8 rad
A specialist long-range radio car used extensively by the Panzerwaffe 1939-43. The excessive amount of stovage carried on the outside of the vehicle suggests the photo was taken during the early part of the invasion of Soviet-Russia when armoured units progressed quickly along the fronts, and moved far away from service and supply facilities. Of note is the on-board motorcycle, visible just above the trooper on the far right.


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Monday, August 01, 2011

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Back again, rainiest summer I ever did see...but in a strange way it's been a nice holiday because I actually enjoy rainy weather. It's so cosy.

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Panzer: Sturmgeschutz III, Ausf G
A nice clean looking Stug in overall dark yellow colour, possibly a new delivery to the unit or perhaps photographed at some barracks far behind the front. Judging from their lack of decorations and the shirt-and-tie attire, the four troopers have probably just finished their training and are heading for the first posting at the front. A crew member who mastered the accordion and could entertain during leisure with the popular tunes of the day (perhaps along with more "official" material like Der Panzerlied) was not uncommon in German WWII units. On close examination of the photo you can make out that the men wear collar and sleeve insignia placing them with the Waffen SS