Monday, April 29, 2013

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An image junkie you, yeees?..no luck with any of the rehab programs, yeees?..been hanging around the big online image libraries again, yeees?...

Well, why doncha just face the fact that you can't be cured... and then quickly dasheth ye over to Tumblr.com, roll up your sleeves and make yourself comfortable at places like achromatic-a

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Panzer: Sdkfz 253
Serving with a mobile artillery unit, the tactical sign visible on the front armour plate, together with what looks like the divisional marking of the  8 Panzer Division
Sdkfz 253's  provided armoured cover and cross country mobility for artillery observers who needed to register the impact of artillery fire on enemy positions and then report the results back to Wehrmacht battery commanders. Belonging to the Sdkfz 250 family, it differed from the standard version by having a fully enclosed fighting compartment. The rationalisation of German armoured production in the second half of WWII led to the discontinuation of highly specialized vehicles like these, their tasks being taken over by simpler designs based on the Sdkfz 250 or 251.
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Monday, April 22, 2013

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Fun that is, by illustrator and artiste Jonathan Speer

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Panzer: Pzkpfw IV, Ausf H
Life in the Panzerwaffe wasn't all about spit-and-polish or risking your life, sometimes you had to carry some nice heavy 75 mm shells. For some reason these Waffen-SS crewmen wear black panzer side caps (with SS skull insignia) but regular Feldbluse field grey tunics, instead of the Waffen-SS version of the black panzer uniform (which was slightly different from the German Army version)
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Monday, April 15, 2013

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I remember that lady well. During the Falklands war, Danish television broadcasted one of her speeches and there was some kind of technical problem, making the sound play backwards. Playing sound backwards has been used for effect in popular music and sound art, because it makes the human voice sound strange and frightening. Like the voice of a  demon.


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Panzer: Personenkraftwagen (Pkw)
The Wehrmacht made extensive use of civilian vehicles during WWII, a practise boosted by the fact that they had access to both the German, Austrian, Czech, French and Soviet automobile industries and thus could supply themselves with what they needed. Often, a coat of camouflage paint and a new license plate was enough to transform a privately owned vehicle into the property of The Reich, but sometimes extensive work was done to bring the car, truck, or lorry in question up to Wehrmacht standards. The car in the photo has been fitted with both a regulation Notek blackout light, Deutsches Reichsbahn loading label (painted on the door) and of course: an MG 34 machine gun, making it useful for mobile anti-aircraft defence. The tactical marking painted on the side door is interesting, but unfortunately I do not know what "E-Zug" and "Erk" stands for, perhaps Erprobungskommando , meaning "test unit".

Monday, April 08, 2013

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Amateur night shot of a city somewhere in America, found on Ebay. On the back is written "1938".
 This could be New York, and the park in the foreground Central Park, but I suppose any metropolis in the US would present a futuristic vision like that at the time. Interesting to discover that photographing the city at night goes back such a long way.

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Panzer: Sdkfz 251/1, ausf A
A rare look into the fighting compartment of a Sdkfz 251, displaying the well designed interior.
The photo was most likely taken at a training facility prior to, or in the early part of WWII, with a lieutenant handing out instructions to aspiring panzergrenadiere. Note the absence of an protective armoured shield around the forward MG mount. This feature was added to later versions of the Sdkfz 251, probably to the delight of German machine gun operators.
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Monday, April 01, 2013

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Captivating Sci-Fi visions, made in 3D by the poetic Arthurblue and rendered in beautiful Vue

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Panzer: Sdkfz 251/11 Ausf C
Very rarely seen in photos, this version of the 251 was specially made for laying out telephone wires  (note the reels attached to the front mudguards) Telegraph and telephone were still widely used means of communication between German front line units in WWII. The location is most likely Russia, summer of 1943 and by then, Ausf C's were being replaced by the newer Ausf D's but a specialist vehicle like an 251/11, which wasn't directly involved in the fighting, could often survive beyond the normal lifespan of a Sdkfz 251. Of special note is the vehicle number painted on the side: I04, meaning that this Fernsprechpanzerwagen served with the 1'st battalion staff, a common practise for highly specialised equipment.
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